Privacy Statement

For each visitor to our Web page, our Web server automatically recognizes no information regarding the domain or e-mail address. We collect the e-mail address of those who communicate with us via e-mail, aggregate information on what pages consumers access or visit, user specific information on what pages consumers access or visit and information volunteered by the consumer, such as survey information and/or site registrations.

The information we collect is used for internal review and is then discarded, used to improve the content of our Web page, used to customize the content and/or layout of our page for individual consumer and used by us to contact consumers for marketing purposes.

If you do not want to receive e-mail from us in the future, please let us know by sending an e-mail, calling or writing, and telling us that you do not want to receive e-mail from our company.

TERMS OF USE STATEMENT

You understand and agree that the owners of this site shall not be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, consequential or exemplary damages, including but not limited to, damages for loss of profits, data or other intangible losses (even if the owners of this site have been advised of the possibility of such damages), resulting from the use or the inability to use the product(s) and or service(s) or any misuse of the product(s) and or service(s) in a manner not in accordance with their intended use.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF PRIVACY POLICY AND PRACTICES

I understand that in an attempt to protect the privacy of my identifiable health information, Advanced Eyecare has established a Privacy Policy and guidelines for Privacy Practices within their office(s). This information details the use and/or disclosure of information contained in my personal medical/optometric records kept for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment, payment and health care operations. In accordance with HIPAA Regulations, a copy of the Advanced Eyecare Privacy Policy & Practices has been made available to me while in the office today. Should I choose to have a personal copy, one will be given to me at no charge.

Hours of Operation

Las Vegas Office

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Testimonials

Reviews By Our Satisfied Patients

  • "Very friendly and helpful staff. Dr. Nguyen was great. Since moving to Las Vegas I have used a different eye center each year for contacts. But I'll be coming here from now on."
    Dave W.
  • "The front office staff is so friendly and helpful, and the doctor was simply awesome!! Thanks so much!"
    Cynthia L.
  • "Got me in fast and fixed my eye. Found a peice of metal in my eye, got it right out."
    Joe O.

Featured Articles

Read up on informative topics

  • Frequently Asked Questions

    Why do I need to see an eye care provider? Many “silent” diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetes, can only be detected through regular eye exams. When these conditions are discovered earlier rather than later, they become easier to treat or manage, allowing for better long-term preservation of eyesight. ...

    Read More
  • Pediatric Ophthlamology

    Ophthalmology addresses the physiology, anatomy and diseases of the eyes. Pediatric ophthalmology focuses on the eyes of children. Pediatric ophthalmologists examine children’s eyes to see if they need corrective lenses or other treatments to improve their vision. Training for Pediatric Ophthalmologists Pediatric ...

    Read More
  • Allergies

    Caused by the same irritants as hay fever, runny nose, coughing, and sneezing, eye allergies commonly affect those who suffer from other allergy symptoms. Not only do eye allergies cause discomfort, but they can also interfere with daily activities. Eye Allergy Causes Medically referred to as allergic ...

    Read More
  • Learning-Related Vision Problems

    Learning disabilities may include dyslexia, math disorder, writing disorder, auditory processing deficits, or visual processing deficits. Although each child with a learning disability is unique, many also have associated visual problems. Addressing these vision disorders may alleviate some symptoms ...

    Read More
  • UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    Optometry warnings about the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation on our eyes have not yet reached the degree of public awareness of that of skin damage. Yet, the sun can be just as damaging upon our eyes with unprotected exposure. Short-term exposure to very bright sunlight can result in a type ...

    Read More
  • Fuchs' Corneal Dystrophy

    Fuchs' dystrophy (pronounced fooks DIS-truh-fee) is an eye disease characterized by degenerative changes to the cornea’s innermost layer of cells. The cause for Fuchs' dystrophy is not fully understood. If your mother or father has the disease, then there is roughly a 50 percent chance that you will ...

    Read More
  • Fuchs Corneal Dystrophy

    Fuchs corneal dystrophy affects the cornea, the clear window over the front of your eye. It causes swelling that leads to cloudiness, glare and increasing visual impairment. Women are slightly more likely than men to develop Fuchs. Onset usually happens after the age of 50; though early signs might start ...

    Read More
  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    One of the leading causes of vision loss in people who are age 50 or older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This common eye condition leads to damage of a small spot near the center of the retina called the macula. The macula provides us with the ability to clearly see objects that are straight ...

    Read More
  • Diabetic Eye Diseases

    Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy ...

    Read More
  • Presbyopia

    Somewhere around the age of 40, most people’s eyes lose the ability to focus on close-up objects. This condition is called presbyopia. You may start holding reading material farther away, because it is blurry up close. Reading suddenly gives you eyestrain. You might wonder when manufacturers started ...

    Read More

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up for more articles